Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Eagle America’

The Finest Example Of A Woodworkers Tool Chest

April 27, 2011 1 comment

Some friends of Eagle America woodorking ran across this amazing tool chest and we thought we would pass it along to our readers.

The Studley tool chest was loaned to the Smithsonian, then displayed in the National Museum of American History as the centerpiece of woodworking.

Look closely. You can see just about every woodworking hand tool ever heard of, beautifully mounted in this highly detailed case.

Mr. Studley, a piano maker by trade, created this mahongany tool chest using detailed inlays of ebony, ivory and mother of pearl.

There are individual cuts and recess for each tool as well as hinged compartments behind the tools seen in the photo that contain even more tools.

Just some of the tools in this chest include: hand saws, hand planes, various measuring tools, drill bits, carving chisels, hammers and much more.

Check out the video below and/or read the Fine Woodworking article.

This is simply amazing …

Cars Made Of Wood

April 25, 2011 3 comments

Betty, an Eagle America customer service representative writes:

When I go on vacation, I am always on the look out for new and different woodworking projects.

I never expected to find a complete “car” made out of wood, but I did.

My husband and I ran across this beautiful example of woodworking  at The Pioneer Auto Show, in Murdo, South Dakota.

I can only imagine how many hours it took to build this car, let alone, the amount of router bits, table saw blades and band saw blades the builder had to go through.

When I got back from vacation, I wanted to see if I could find any more examples of cars made out of wood.

To my surprise, there are a lot more woodworkers building cars out of wood than I realized.

Below are just a few more examples I found on to web.

Woodworker or not these cars are worth checking out!

 

 

“Use every bit of the tree!”

April 23, 2011 1 comment

Mary, an Eagle America customer service representative writes:

Just like any woodworker that keeps wood scraps around the workshop, fabric artists keep bits and pieces of fabric just in case they are needed for a future project.

My husband keeps all kinds of small pieces of lumber and molding  so I keep scraps of wool and cotton fabric from my various sewing projects.

Recently, I wanted to create something different for my website so with spring in the air and the new shoots of flowers emerging from the flower beds, I came up with these simple flower pins.

Once I had a few completed, I brought them into Eagle America and joked that this was a woodworking project since the stems of the flowers were made from the sticks of tree branches.

Rabbet Gauges – Limited Run

April 4, 2011 Leave a comment

Introducing Woodpeckers newest One-Time Tools, three different Rabbet Gauges. What’s a rabbet gauge? It’s a tool designed to help woodworker’s layout rabbets before cutting.

Rabbets are most commonly created with a table saw or router. Most often they’re cut with router bits that have bearing guides for setting one dimension. Straight bits or saw blades on the other hand have the advantage of allowing you to create any size rabbet you might need.

In either case at least one of the dimensions are reached with a series of trial and error cuts. A better way is to accurately mark off where the finish cuts should be. That’s where the Rabbet Gauges come in.

With these tools it’s very easy to scribe a line on both faces so you have a target to shoot for. In fact if you use a scribing knife you can reduce chipping along the edge. A pencil mark is also a very nice marking option. The trick when using these gauges is to stop your cut just short of the pencil mark. Keep in mind that the steps in the gauges are exactly the finished dimension so the cut should be just at but not into the pencil line.

Three different sizes are available:

  • TRG-1614 (1/16″, 1/8″, 3/16″, 1/4″)
  • TRG-51612 (5/16″, 3/8″, 7/16″, 1/2″)
  • TRG-91624 (9/16″, 5/8″, 11/16″, 3/4″)

No matter if you are scribing or drawing the line, the Woodpeckers Rabbet Gauge makes rabbeting much easier. By providing an accurate, consistent and easy to maneuver gauge for one of woodworkings most common operations, you’re sure to get plenty of use from these fine American made tools.

Each gauge is precision machined from a solid block of aluminum then anodized for durability and engraved with rabbet dimensions.

Please keep in mind that these are One-Time Tools and can only be ordered up until 11:59pm Monday April 11th 2011.

NOTE: Tools are made to order and ship the week of May 23, 2011.

Wall Cupboard Display

March 29, 2011 Leave a comment

 

Mary, one of Eagle America’s customer service representatives writes:

 

I have collected Wade figurines for 25 years.

It started innocently enough with the Rose Tea giveaways and now it has blossomed into a full blown obsession.

My collection had out grown its original antique medicine showcase so my darling, Mike, built a wall cupboard for me.

We designed it together and it turned out great.

 

 

 

The bits Mike used on the top and bottom were from Eagle America’s Price Cutter router bit line.

They were profiles P14-2911, P14-3107 & P14-3115.

I wanted a beaded board back for interest but we kept the stains light to highlight the figurines.

We added a cap at the top and bottom to soften the edges.

 

The clasp to hold the door tight are rare earth magnets embedded in the top of the door and the inside corner of the frame.

As you can see the new cupboard is full so I think he should get started on another one, don’t you?

Mary

Make Beautiful Boxes By Adding A Few Splines

March 7, 2011 Leave a comment

The Eagle America Spline Jig was designed for your table saw to save you time and help you safely create strong, decorative joints. Used when making fine furniture, picture frames and boxes, spline joints are one of the most beautiful methods of joinery used in woodworking.

You can use contrasting wood tones or various spline thicknesses to create decorative accents. Spline joints are not only attractive but they feature extra gluing surfaces when compared to a plain joint, making them one of the strongest joints you can make.

The jig measures 12″ W x 24″ L and features an embedded t-track with two stop blocks. Use both stop blocks to sandwich and cut splines in narrow projects, one stop block to clamp and index cuts on medium sized projects or remove both stop blocks for larger projects such as boxes.

The base of the jig is made from durable 1/2″ HDPE which creates a smooth, non-marring surface that slides easily across your table saw top. The adjustable 18″ miter bar will fit in any standard 3/4″ miter slot. Made in USA!

We also recommend using our Thin Rip Jig which allows you to safely and accurately cut thin splines on the left-hand side of the blade so there is no burning, binding or kickback.

Building A Simple Knife Block

February 12, 2011 Leave a comment

The other day I was at my mother-in-laws house for dinner and she asked me if I could make something for her. I already had several irons in the fire but what was one more.

Before I even knew what it was, I told her “yes” so I was committed to the project, large or small.

She walked over to her kitchen counter and picked up a small knife block and set it on the dining room table in front of me. I looked at it and said, “Is that it?” I was shocked and relieved that I had just been asked to do one of the simplest woodworking projects I had ever seen. She told me she wanted some more to set out on the tables during large family gatherings and parties.

That evening I took her store bought version with me as a sample, even though it was not really necessary.

The next day, I gathered up some wood scraps and cut offs I had sitting around the woodshop and immediately went to work.

The cores of the Knife Blocks are 2” wide, 5” long and 2” thick. I put a full kerf blade in my table saw and set the height of the blade and my fence to the spacing I desired.  After a few passes through the table saw, I had 6 slots for the knives. I cut two 1/4” side panels for each block and glued them in place.

After a little sanding and finishing the Knife Blocks were complete. The setup process was so quick and easy; I made about 20 Knife Blocks and plan to pass them out to the rest of the family.

So, if you are looking for a simple project to make your mother-in -law happy, make her a Knife Block for her knives.

Just remember not to start making jokes when she’s putting the knives in it!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.